Museum of Ice Cream

Everybody loves Ice Cream. Even though we have snow in Bay Area, San Francisco. It is so cold after so many years drought. We almost forgot to use jackets now.
Everybody loves Ice Cream. The museum’s educational value as ice cream has nutritional value includes rooms with banana swings, a Pop Rocks cave, and a pink retro diner area, where patrons are provided a scoop of ice cream from rotating ice cream vendors.


The Million Dollar Tip

Happiness is priceless.:)

According to the owner of the blog post and comments, i am writing this.

I read one report that said the seller in Germany was a relative of his ??? Not verified.

This story hits me on several levels. First of all, I’m struck by the fact that Einstein was prescient enough to know that his fame would make that napkin worth so very, very much. Claim ownership of a scrap of decades old paper with a message that urges them to stop scrambling, to stop trying to outdo.

He was already pretty famous in 1922, the message was said to notify him of his Nobel Prize while he was on a lecture tour in Japan. So, I guess he knew.
I get the irony in the mad bidding for his note, and maybe in the contrast to the 2nd note that professed “where there’s a will…” ? It seems to point to that pursuit of success.

“Einstein could explain the most complex matters in such simple language that anyone with just a bit of the proper background could understand them.” When acknowledged for this talent, according to my father, Einstein always said that he felt that if someone couldn’t explain something simply they simply didn’t understand it well enough themselves.:)



He didn’t have change to tip the courier who brought a message to his Tokyo hotel room. So Albert Einstein wrote him a brief note on hotel stationery, telling him it might be of some value later. The 1922 message has been called Einstein’s “Theory of Happiness”, and yesterday sold at a Jerusalem auction for […]

via The Million Dollar Tip — vanbytheriver

The history of new year ball

Portsmouth, England 1829 British sailing ships use Chronometer navigate time it wasn’t working properly. Later they use ball for time.

The first New Year’s Eve Ball dropped from a flagpole  in 1907 to rally attention to the new New York Times building. Made from iron and wood, the Ball was decorated with hundred light bulbs.

Beginnings (1907–1908) The first New Year’s Eve celebration in Times Square was held on December 31, 1904; The New York Times’ owner, Adolph  decided to celebrate the opening of the newspaper’s new headquarters, One Times Square, with a New Year’s fireworks show on the roof of the building to welcome 1905.

The current Ball is a whopping and around 11 feet wide.


Epic Christmas Lights

Epic Christmas Lights!!!!



Neighborhood Synchronized Christmas Lights Show

Neighborhood Synchronized Christmas Lights Show

Yucaipa, California


Orchestral and Instrumental Christmas

Wonderful Christmas songs.:)



Christmas Markets in Europe

Most Beautiful Christmas Markets in Europe 🙂 Enjoy