Popularity contest

Young adults mind is like a clay. It can mold easily to any shape. This is important for young adults to keep themselves busy and happy with motivated mindset.

“We know from social-comparison research and social psychology that a lot of people think they’re doing better than others, so we thought maybe students think that they have a lot of friends and their peers don’t”.

“Because when we’re out in public, we look out into our social environment and we see people happy and laughing, and we don’t see when people are alone, upset in their bedroom,” she said. “When you’re new to a social network, you feel uncertain, you’re not sure about your role in that social network, you’re not sure about other people’s roles, so you might be more willing or more likely to anchor your judgments of yourself and others based on what you can observe.”

People with more anxiety, always gain more stress. They always want to become more popular. They don’t need to have popularity. They need to have few good friends.

 

 

College freshmen often believe friends are having more fun

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Choral singing and mind

Choral singing and mind

 


New research points to one reason joining a choir boost mental health.

Bay area is getting more cars and stress. Last few years, bay areas populations increase so, more cars more stress and anxiety develop recently.

The morning commute is getting tough too. Especially when people “Honk”.

I don’t like when people honk, we are not used to. Used to be very rude. We don’t have the habit to honk anybody.

As soon as I listen to my favorite song. It lowers my stress level.

I think joining Choral is a good idea for anybody, it will make their stressful life to simple good life.

points to one reason joining a choir boost mental health. The new research points to one reason joining a choir boost mental health.

The study “supports the existence of a specific ‘choir effect,'” write psychologists Julie Lynch and Charlotte Wilson of Trinity College Dublin. Their research is published in the journal Psychology of Music.

A wealth of academic research demonstrates an empirical link between choral singing and well-being. This study investigated the construct of state mindfulness as a potential generative mechanism by which this link exists. A within-subject design measured levels of state mindfulness in choristers before and after a choir rehearsal. Assessing state mindfulness before and after listening to a piece of music at home acted as the control condition. State mindfulness was assessed by the Mindful State Questionnaire (MSQ) among a sample of 83 adult amateur choristers (65 females, mean age 51.9 years). The development and psychometric properties of the MSQ are described. Paired t-tests revealed significant increases in levels of state mindfulness for both conditions (choir singing; t = 10.82, p < .001, η2 = 0.58; listening to music; t = 4.48, p < .001, η2 = 0.21), however the effect sizes and confidence intervals indicated a far greater effect for the choral singing condition.

According to their research. The research result  include, “I am aware of my feelings without getting lost in them”; “I am finding it easy to concentrate on what I am doing”; and “I am daydreaming, worrying, or otherwise distracted.”

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0305735617729452

https://psmag.com/news/dont-let-your-mind-miss-out-on-a-prime-opera-tunity

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/honk